Russia Loses 24 of Its Best Fighter Jets, Turns to Obsolete Planes: Ukraine

Newsweek –  Jason Lemon

Russia is reportedly turning to “outdated” fighter jets after it lost about two dozen Su-35 aircraft in its ongoing assault on Ukraine, according to a social media post on Thursday.

In a post, the General Staff of the Armed Forces of Ukraine said that Russia was going to start using “old” Su-24M bombers after Moscow’s forces lost “two squadrons” in the war.

“The SU-35 aircrafts also showed a low level of durability. During the full-scale aggression, the occupants lost two squadrons of such aircraft—it’s about 24 units,” Ukrainian Brigadier General Alexei Gromov said, the post reported.

Brigadier General Oleksiy Hromov reportedly said that Russia “plans to use outdated Su-24M bombers.” Hromov also said Thursday that Moscow’s accuracy in recent strikes has been low, as its pilots reportedly want to avoid being shot down.

“The enemy’s planes and helicopters avoid flying into the range of our air defences, and therefore the accuracy of these strikes is low,” the general said, Reuters reported.

Newsweek has not verified Ukraine’s statements about the Russian planes.

Moscow continues to say that its “military action” in Ukraine is going according to plan, despite a lack of substantial gains and a major walk-back from its early ambitions of taking control of the country. Putin’s forces are now focusing their efforts far more narrowly on the south-eastern Donbas region in recent months, after failing to make significant forward progress in the first several weeks of the war.

Putin and other Kremlin leaders said that their invasion is necessary to “de-Nazify” Ukraine, whose president, Volodymyr Zelensky, is Jewish and was elected with nearly three-quarters of the vote in 2019. At that time, Ukraine’s prime minister was also Jewish. Members of Zelensky’s family died in the Holocaust.

On Wednesday, Ukraine’s armed forces said that nine Russian military aircraft had been destroyed at a Crimea base. Crimea was recognized as part of Ukraine under international law and treaties, but Moscow annexed the region in 2015 as it also backed separatist rebels in eastern regions of Ukraine. Russia denied that the aircraft had been destroyed, and Ukraine stopped short of claiming responsibility for their destruction.

 

 

 

 

THERE IS MORE TO THIS AMF/ADF – Bob Buick MM

Last night on SKY (Paul Murray) the interim report from the RC into Defence suicides was presented and it’s all blaming DVA so I have sent this email to the likes of Bolt. Credlin, Murray and others hoping they will raise the comparison between the AMF and ADF in regard to the care and responsibility of the ADF to its members. Bob

Once you have read what Bob has written I invite you to comment. It is right now I wish we had the forum up and running. Ray

I served over twenty years in Infantry with the AMF, Australian Military Forces 1959-1980, retiring as a Warrant Officer First Class, a platoon sergeant of 11 Platoon at Long Tan and awarded the Military Medal. I present this background so that I am identified as a warrior, not one who has not experienced years of service and without operational service and able to comment on what I believe is the possible cause of suicide of those in the ADF. There has never been a suicide of those who served with D Company 6RAR Vietnam 1966-7 and over one hundred and seventy passed through the company roll book in the year.

In the 1980s the Hawke Government created the ADF along the lines of the Canadian Arm Forces adopting changed administrative procedures used by the AMF that were based on those successfully used from WW2. When one enlisted into the AMF (Army) it was for a period of three or six years and early discharge was not permitted except for extenuating circumstances, like compassionate or serious breaches of military conduct. Those who were wounded due to operational service, or loss of a limb or more importantly identified with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) were able to remain in service and transfer to another corps enabling the soldier to remain active in the service. An example, in my platoon, was a soldier who became the platoon’s radio operator after Long Tan, August 1966. In the November of 1966 the platoon suffered one KIA (Killed in Action) and thirteen WIA (Wounded in Action), my radio operator lost a foot, but he served for another thirty years retiring as a Major.

It is my understanding that those joining the ADF (Army) now sign a contract to be employed in a specific Corps, like Infantry, or Intelligence for a specific period, but here comes the rub, the difference between the AMF and ADF.

Using the example above the continuance in the service (Army) is not offered or given because the soldier WIA or identified with PTSD is in breach of contract and therefore discharged from the ADF. I attached two docs the second is a submission to the Minister for Veteran’s Affairs 2017, which created a meeting meet with the Minister’s Chief of Staff at Parliament House after a screening of the film “Danger Close” – the Battle of Long Tan in 2019.

I never submitted the 2nd attachment to the RC because I expected my letter to be already included documentation researched by the RC.

I send this email to you because in my mind the DVA is not totally at fault but there is a causal link caused by Defence and the contractual details enlistees are bound by. The second attachment is based on a discussion I had many years ago with a member of 2RAR and therefore an example of what can be extrapolated from a discussion, but, interesting if a comparison between suicide post-Vietnam to post-Iraq/Afghanistan would raise different outcomes to that I heard in the interim report from the present RC.

I do believe that the RC will not reach suitable recommendations to change government procedures, but that is something you could investigate and raise with the people involved.

Regards

Bob Buick

TWO ATTACHMENTS CLICK LINKS TO OPEN

For website – Letter to DVA re suicides AMF-ADF

Diggers home from battle but war not over

Minister apologises for failing veterans

The federal government has apologised to Australian veterans and their families for failings in the way the defence forces and veterans’ affairs department have operated.

The apology comes after the Royal Commission into Defence and Veteran Suicide released its 300-page interim report and 13 initial recommendations on Thursday.

“To people that have felt they have not got the treatment that they deserve … I apologise for that,” Veterans’ Affairs Minister Matt Keogh told reporters in Canberra.

“It wasn’t under our watch, but as the government of this country, veterans always deserve the best and we should be delivering that.”

Opposition Leader Peter Dutton said Australians wanted to see veterans treated better, but issues could not be fixed overnight.

“Certainly, from my perspective (the coalition) provided every support, not just through increased funding but additional support through services, mental health services and the like,” Mr Dutton told reporters in Sydney.

“There is enough blame to share across both sides of politics, but I think this is not an issue about politics … we should be doing more as a country to provide support to those who defend us and keep us safe.”

The commission recommends urgent changes need to be made to Australia’s defence personnel support network, and that the backlog of more than 41,000 veterans’ claims be cleared by March 2024.

It also recommends the government introduce legislation to parliament to simplify and harmonise veteran compensation and rehabilitation.

Opposition veterans’ affairs spokesman Barnaby Joyce said the coalition expects to support the government as much as it can in that process,.

“I don’t expect veterans’ access to the support they’re entitled to to be delayed by unnecessary reasons,” he told AAP.

“It’s vitally important that this process takes place. I was always a supporter of a royal commission, and it was the coalition that brought it about in government.”

Mr Keogh said he didn’t have a time frame for when the backlog would be cleared, but he wants it done as soon as possible.

He said the government has allocated 500 additional staff to the department to help process the claims.

“All people who put on a uniform and sign up to serve our nation … deserve the best support while serving and after they transition to civilian life,” Mr Keogh said.

“This is particularly the case when individuals encounter mental and physical injury. This is a commitment that we owe our defence personnel, veterans and their families.”

Mr Joyce wants more details on the funding and tasks of the additional staff, and expects the government to provide information in the October budget.

“A number is important, but the process of what they actually do is vital to understand the issue is being addressed,” he said.

Mr Joyce also called for the veterans’ portfolio to be returned to cabinet.

“Having veterans’ affairs languishing in the outer ministry … does not show proper respect for the importance of the issues in need of reform,” he said.

“The government … must show competency, not just in what needs to be done, but in how it is actually going to do it.”

Meanwhile, Mr Keogh said he had confidence in the veterans’ affairs department to assist defence personnel as much as possible.

A formal response from the government to the commission will be provided in the coming months.

“We recognise the importance and the significance of this report. It is vital that these (recommendations) are now addressed as a priority,” Mr Keogh said.

The royal commission will continue its inquiry, with its final report due by June 2024.

Lifeline 13 11 14

Open Arms 1800 011 046

 

Government given defence support deadline

Photo: Governor-General David Hurley, left, receives the interim report from commissioner Nick Kaldas. Photo: AAP

The federal government has apologised to Australian veterans and their families for failings in the way the defence forces and veterans’ affairs department have operated.

The apology came after the Royal Commission into Defence and Veteran Suicide released its 300-page interim report and 13 initial recommendations on Thursday.

“To people that have felt they have not got the treatment that they deserve … I apologise for that,” Veterans’ Affairs Minister Matt Keogh said in Canberra.

“It wasn’t under our watch, but as the government of this country, veterans always deserve the best and we should be delivering that.”

Opposition Leader Peter Dutton said Australians wanted to see veterans treated better, but issues could not be fixed overnight.

“Certainly from my perspective [the Coalition] provided every support, not just through increased funding but additional support through services, mental health services and the like,” Mr Dutton said in Sydney.

“There is enough blame to share across both sides of politics, but I think this is not an issue about politics … we should be doing more as a country to provide support to those who defend us and keep us safe.”

The commission recommended urgent changes to Australia’s defence personnel support network, and that the backlog of more than 41,000 veterans’ claims be cleared by March 2024.

It also recommended the government introduce legislation to parliament to simplify and harmonise veteran compensation and rehabilitation.

Opposition veterans’ affairs spokesman Barnaby Joyce said the Coalition expected to support the government as much as it could in that process.

“I don’t expect veterans’ access to the support they’re entitled to be delayed by unnecessary reasons,” he said.

“It’s vitally important that this process takes place. I was always a supporter of a royal commission, and it was the Coalition that brought it about in government.”

Mr Keogh said he didn’t have a time frame for when the backlog would be cleared, but he wanted it done as soon as possible. He said the government had allocated 500 additional staff to the department to help process the claims.

“All people who put on a uniform and sign up to serve our nation … deserve the best support while serving and after they transition to civilian life,” Mr Keogh said.

“This is particularly the case when individuals encounter mental and physical injury. This is a commitment that we owe our defence personnel, veterans and their families.”

Mr Joyce wanted more details on the funding and tasks of the additional staff and expected the government to provide information in the October budget.

“A number is important, but the process of what they actually do is vital to understand the issue is being addressed,” he said.

Mr Joyce also called for the veterans’ portfolio to be returned to cabinet.

“Having veterans’ affairs languishing in the outer ministry … does not show proper respect for the importance of the issues in need of reform,” he said.

“The government … must show competency, not just in what needs to be done, but in how it is actually going to do it.”

Meanwhile, Mr Keogh said he had confidence in the veterans’ affairs department to assist defence personnel as much as possible.

A formal response from the government to the commission will be provided in the coming months.

“We recognise the importance and the significance of this report. It is vital that these [recommendations] are now addressed as a priority,” Mr Keogh said.

The royal commission will continue its inquiry, with its final report due by June 2024.

Lifeline 13 11 14

Open Arms 1800 011 046

Bushmaster goes electric: Australia unveils silent, electrified personnel vehicle

The Australian defence force is going green – and we’re not talking about a new shade of camouflage paint. We’re talking about the electrification of its famous Bushmaster protected military vehicle.

An all-electric Protected Military Vehicle (ePMV) concept was unveiled at the Chief of Army Symposium in Adelaide on Wednesday, as part of a showcase looking at how the defence force will become “future ready.”

Powered by a battery giving a maximum all-electric range of 100km, the ePMV can also be built with a larger battery giving up to 300km range.

The all-electric version will be trialled to explore suitability and other factors, but the ePMV is expected to enter the field eventually employing a hybrid electric drive for 140kW power and 480Nm continuous torque, with a diesel engine that acts as a range extender.

The addition of a battery gives the vehicle an additional “super power” in the field and reduces the dependence on fossil fuel logistics: that, of course is the ability to operate in the field completely silently, at least when the diesel engine is not fired up.

The 11-ton, 4×4 blast and ballistic protected mobility vehicle has a 4-ton payload and provides protection against mines and improvised explosive devices, shrapnel from artillery and small arms fire.

When in the field, the Bushmaster’s optimised power management system can offer 24-36 hours of silent watch when operating with battery power only.

In a statement shared by the department of defence, assistant minister Matt Thistlethwaite said that “the new ePMV represents the next innovative stage in that tradition.”

The Bushmaster ePMV will be used in trials to determine its suitability in the field.

“This ePMV brings the benefits of electric vehicles to the battlefield, particularly being quieter than its combustion counterparts, and I look forward to seeing it perform in field trials,” he said.

Defence charged over death of RAAF member

The Department of Defence has been charged with breaching Commonwealth work health and safety laws for allegedly failing to manage psychological risks in relation to the death of a worker.

Following a Comcare investigation, the Commonwealth Director of Public Prosecutions has filed three charges in the NSW Local Court at Maitland alleging Defence failed in its primary duty under the federal Work Health and Safety Act 2011 (WHS Act).

The worker, a Royal Australian Air Force technician at Williamtown near Newcastle, took his own life while on duty at the base on 28 July 2020.

It is alleged Defence breached its health and safety duty under section 19(1) of the WHS Act by failing to provide, so far as reasonably practicable:

  • Safe systems of work
  • Necessary training to workers
  • Information necessary to protect all persons from risks to their health and safety

All charges relate to alleged failures in managing risks to psychological health and safety during the administration of Defence workplace policies and procedures.

The three criminal charges consist of:

  • One Category 2 offence, carrying a maximum penalty of $1.5 million
  • Two Category 3 offences, each carrying a maximum penalty of $500,000

The matter is listed for mention in the Maitland Local Court on 29 September 2022.

THE VUNG FERRY

HMAS Sydney (III) in her configuration as a Fast Troop Transport undertook numerous voyages to Vietnam between 1965-1972. This short video records the voyage undertaken between 15 November 1969 – 12 December 1969, during which she carried members of 8 Battalion, Royal Australian Regiment (RAR) to Vung Tau before returning to Sydney with members of 9 Battalion, RAR.

The Commissioners have delivered the Interim Report to the Governor-General

At 9:00 am today the Commissioners, Nick Kaldas APM (Chair), The Hon James Douglas QC and Dr Peggy Brown AO presented the Interim Report of the Royal Commission into Defence and Veteran Suicide to the Governor-General, His Excellency, General the Honourable David Hurley AC DSC (Retd).

Delivering our interim report on 11 August, 2022 is required by the Letters Patent that established the Royal Commission into Defence and Veteran Suicide. The Commissioners will continue their inquiries until June 2024, when they will share the Royal Commission’s final report and recommendations.

The interim report includes some urgent recommendations as well as preliminary observations, which will now be considered by the Government.

What happens next?

We anticipate the Government will make the report available publicly as soon as possible after it is delivered to the Governor-General.

Once the interim report has been made public, the Royal Commission will publish it in hard copy and digital editions. We will share links to the digital version of the Royal Commission into Defence and Veteran Suicide Interim Report through our newsletter to subscribers.

‘Hoaxed’: State of the Environment report relies on ‘New Age Aboriginal spirituality

You’ve been hoaxed. You are the victim of a monumental fraud by Environment Minister Tanya Plibersek groovers… ??

Plibersek last week released the five-yearly State of the Environment Report, which she claimed was the work of “experts” who’d found our “environment is in a poor state and getting worse”.

The report was “confronting”, “depressing” and “shocking”, groaned Plibersek, who immediately promised to lock up 30 per cent of Australia in parks and reserves – half as much again as is protected already.

Yes, this report is shocking, all right. But not in the way Plibersek meant. It’s shocking evidence of our intellectual decline, and of the Albanese government passing off a new age Aboriginal spirituality as the last word in science.

Not that the media noticed – or dared point out. The Guardian Australia, for instance, insisted this “shocking report” was “completed by scientists”. The ABC agreed it was “written by 30 independent scientists”.

But it wasn’t. Many of the authors are actually Aboriginal activists, writers and even a “curator”. One is a student.

And the authors who are indeed scientists don’t appear for the most part independent. Many are warmists of long standing, almost all working for government agencies.

A lot of this report is not science at all.

For instance, the report says some of its research comes from “Indigenous knowledge systems” and “yarning circles” with Aborigines, and every chapter starts with a quotation in an Aboriginal language of what you’d take to be some supposed Aboriginal wisdom.

In fact, each quotation sounds more like the babbling of a Byron Bay eco-mystic.

The chapter on climate, for instance, starts: “Listen to country fighting for the day after tomorrow, people arise to heal country to live.”

But check some of the named “scientists” and “experts” behind Plibersek’s report. The three lead authors include two scientists, but also Terri Janke, described as “a Meriam/Wuthathi woman and an international authority on Indigenous Cultural and Intellectual Property”.

Straight away we’re warned: this report is not just science.

Or take the chapter on our supposedly dangerous new climate. Only one of its three authors is a qualified scientist.

The other two are Damian Moran-Bulled, described in the report as “a proud Yorta Yorta man” who “has worked within the cultural heritage and natural resource management field”, and Sonia Cooper, “a Yorta Yorta woman” with “a strong interest in culture, the environment, science, policy, law, contracts and geopolitics”.

Cooper, we’re told, is “currently completing her Bachelor of Science degree”.

So a student is now co-author of an allegedly scientific report to government which the Environment Minister cites to lock up a third of our continent?

In every chapter of the report, it seems, it’s the same story, with many authors apparently chosen for their race above any scientific qualifications.

For instance, one of the two authors of the critical chapter on extreme events is Oliver Costello, who identifies as a “Bundjalung man” who “believes strongly in the role of Aboriginal culture as a keystone to maintaining livelihoods, supporting identity, connection to Country and enabling healthy and regenerative communities to care for Country”.

Costello, who campaigns for more “cultural burning”, has no scientific qualifications.

The report says, “he holds a Bachelor of Arts in Adult Education and Community Management”.

A co-author of two of the chapters is Zena Cumpston, described as a “Barkandji woman” who “works as a writer, curator, consultant and researcher and is passionate about truth-telling and undertaking projects that directly benefit her community and Country”.

Yet another is a senior official of the green activist group WWF.

The Department of Climate Change, Energy, the Environment and Water seems to have selected exactly the “experts” likely to produce a desired conclusion – that our environment is terrible, global warming is catastrophic and “mining and agriculture have been identified by Indigenous people as causing degradation to Country”.

Yet the most frightening about this is Plibersek, our Environment Minister, took it seriously.

She’s not just decided to keep farmers and miners out of much more of our land, but last week froze work on a $4.5bn project to make fertiliser that our farmers desperately need after a few Aboriginal activists claimed its emissions somehow hurt nearby cave paintings.

Who knows if those activists have any science behind them, but does it matter?

Plibersek has just proved she cannot tell the difference between science and religion, anyway, and all of us must now pay!

Andrew Bolt – The Daily Telegraph

 

Vale 43106 Robert James (Bob) Braid – RAA

8 Apr 1942 – 9 Aug 2022

We have received advice of the death on 9 August 2022 of Robert James Braid. Bob served in Vietnam with 104th Field Battery as a Gun Sergeant from May to December 1971. Bob was a South Australian but died in Cairns after apparently a long illness. No other details are available currently. Bob was 80.

RIP Robert James Braid

P J Bruce, OAM, JP